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Everett Miller
Everett Miller

Buy Depo Testosterone [CRACKED]



Testosterone replacement therapy is a hormone replacement therapy for men to treat hypogonadism or low testosterone levels. Men typically use testosterone therapy for symptoms such as low libido, depressed mood and decreased energy levels.




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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved testosterone therapy for men who want to address hypogonadism and low testosterone. Hypogonadism is when the body does not produce enough testosterone, and it occurs in 19% of men in their 60s. The rates increase for men in their 70s (28%) and 80s (49%).


The popularity of testosterone therapy rose from 2000 to 2013, when a multitude of the hormone products came to market. More than 2 million Americans took testosterone products, including older men using it to improve libido.


The FDA later warned men about the dangerous side effects of these products, including cardiac events. Although testosterone therapy remains popular, concerns about side effects may ultimately reduce demand.


Your body has androgen receptors in tissues throughout your body that help your body use hormones for different important functions. These receptors in tissues from reproductive organs to the brain all respond to increased testosterone taken orally, through injections or through the skin in patches, gels and creams.


When you start testosterone therapy, the hormone produces increased muscle mass, more body hair and increased sex drive. Some effects of TRT can be felt within weeks, while others build over the course of months.


Testosterone, as a Schedule III drug, is available only with a prescription. Although there are many supplements claiming to boost testosterone, these over-the-counter products do not contain testosterone and lack any peer reviewed evidence of effectiveness.


Despite sufficient scientific data to support claims, manufacturers have suggested their products increase muscle mass, strength and sex drive in men. Among the most popular testosterone boosters are products containing Tribulus terrestris, DHEA, zinc and d-aspartic acid.


Other causes of Low T include an injury to the testicles, cancer treatments, chronic diseases and stress. Lack of this key sex hormone can also cause health issues, including osteoporosis, loss of muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) and psychological symptoms. Doctors prescribe testosterone drugs to treat these symptoms.


As men age, erectile dysfunction (ED), the inability to get or maintain an erection, is common. Before Pfizer released Viagra in 1998 as a medication for ED, doctors often turned to testosterone as a treatment.


For many men, the biggest benefit of testosterone therapy is an improved sex drive. But there are other benefits related to muscle growth and body mass, which high-performance athletes and physical trainers acknowledge.


Because it involves a potent hormone, testosterone therapy carries a handful of risk factors. Some are common while others are rare. Not all are serious, but anyone who undergoes therapy should be aware of the potential life-changing side effects.


Recent studies had mixed findings about links between testosterone replacement therapy and increased risks of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Research linking it to an increased risk of cardiac events is still a source of debate, and studies continue to examine long-term cardiovascular risks.


Multiple research studies tie high concentrations of testosterone products to an increase in heart failure events, though there is some debate. Some scientists suspect it may be related to elevated blood pressure.


The FDA in 2014 warned against using testosterone therapy for age-related low T, noting the therapy requires more study. An ongoing testosterone replacement therapy trial related to the testosterone and heart-related side effects is scheduled to conclude in late 2022.


The FDA approved testosterone products only for men with low testosterone levels. Children should never be exposed to testosterone products because they can cause premature puberty and health problems such as liver damage.


Women can inadvertently and dangerously raise their testosterone through skin to skin contact with a man undergoing treatment. Most exposures happen with the gel and cream forms of TRT. When women are exposed to testosterone they may also experience increased hair growth on her face and body, a deeper voice and increased muscle mass.


Testosterone is the primary androgen found in the body. Endogenous testosterone is synthesized by cells in the testis, ovary, and adrenal cortex. Therapeutically, testosterone is used in the management of hypogonadism, either congenital or acquired. Testosterone is also the most effective exogenous androgen for the palliative treatment of carcinoma of the breast in postmenopausal women. Testosterone was in use in 1938 and approved by the FDA in 1939. Anabolic steroids, derivatives of testosterone, have been used illicitly and are now controlled substances. Testosterone, like many anabolic steroids, was classified as a controlled substance in 1991. Testosterone is administered parenterally in regular and delayed-release (depot) dosage forms. In September 1995, the FDA initially approved testosterone transdermal patches (Androderm); many transdermal forms and brands are now available including implants, gels, and topical solutions. A testosterone buccal system, Striant, was FDA approved in July 2003; the system is a mucoadhesive product that adheres to the buccal mucosa and provides a controlled and sustained release of testosterone. In May 2014, the FDA approved an intranasal gel formulation (Natesto). A transdermal patch (Intrinsa) for hormone replacement in women is under investigation; the daily dosages used in women are much lower than for products used in males. The FDA ruled in late 2004 that it would delay the approval of Intrinsa women's testosterone patch and has required more data regarding safety, especially in relation to cardiovascular and breast health.


Endogenous testosterone is responsible for sexual maturation at all stages of development throughout life. Synthetically, it is prepared from cholesterol. The function of androgens in male development begins in the fetus, is crucial during puberty, and continues to play an important role in the adult male. Women also secrete small amounts of testosterone from the ovaries. The secretion of androgens from the adrenal cortex is insufficient to maintain male sexuality.


Increased androgen plasma concentrations suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (reducing endogenous testosterone), luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone by a negative-feedback mechanism. Testosterone also affects the formation of erythropoietin, the balance of calcium, and blood glucose. Androgens have a high lipid solubility, enabling them to rapidly enter cells of target tissues. Within the cells, testosterone undergoes enzymatic conversion to 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone and forms a loosely bound complex with cystolic receptors. Androgen action arises from the initiation of transcription and cellular changes in the nucleus brought about by this steroid-receptor complex.


Testosterone is metabolized primarily in the liver to various 17-keto steroids. It is a substrate for hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 isoenzyme.1 Estradiol and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are the major active metabolites, and DHT undergoes further metabolism. Testosterone activity appears to depend on formation of DHT, which binds to cytosol receptor proteins. Further metabolism of DHT takes place in reproductive tissues. About 90% of an intramuscular testosterone dose is excreted in the urine as conjugates of glucuronic and sulfuric acids. About 6% is excreted in the feces, largely unconjugated. There is considerable variation in the half-life of testosterone as reported in the literature, ranging from 10 to 100 minutes.2


Who should not take this medication? Children should not use testosterone unless directed otherwise by a physician. Your health care provider needs to know if you have any of these conditions: breast cancer; breathing problems while sleeping; diabetes; heart disease; if a female partner is pregnant or trying to get pregnant; kidney disease; liver disease; lung disease; prostate cancer, enlargement; any unusual or allergic reactions to testosterone or other products; pregnant or trying to get pregnant; breast-feeding. Your healthcare provider will need to have regular bloodwork drawn while on testosterone. This medication is banned from use in athltes by most athletic organizations..


Who should not take this medication? Children should not use testosterone unless directed otherwise by a physician. Your health care provider needs to know if you have any of these conditions: breast cancer; breathing problems while sleeping; diabetes; heart disease; if a female partner is pregnant or trying to get pregnant; kidney disease; liver disease; lung disease; prostate cancer, enlargement; any unusual or allergic reactions to testosterone or other products; pregnant or trying to get pregnant; breast-feeding. Your healthcare provider will need to have regular bloodwork drawn while on testosterone. This medication is banned from use in athletes by most athletic organizations.


The manufacturers of AndroGel and Striant state that their products are contraindicated in patients with soybean, soy, or soya lecithin hypersensitivity because they are derived partially from soy plants. Topical gels and solutions are typically flammable, therefore exposure to fire, flame, and tobacco smoking should be avoided while using any topical gel or solution formulation of testosterone. Testosterone undecanoate (Aveed) oil for injection contains benzyl benzoate, the ester of benzyl alcohol and benzoic acid, and refined castor oil. Therefore, testosterone undecanoate use is contraindicated in patients with polyoxyethylated castor oil hypersensitivity, benzoic acid hypersensitivity, or benzyl alcohol hypersensitivity.4


Because some testosterone transdermal systems (e.g., Androderm) contain aluminum or other metal components, patients should be instructed to remove the patch before undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Metal components contained in the backing of some transdermal systems can overheat during an MRI scan and cause skin burns in the area where the patch is adhered. 041b061a72


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